SAFETY: Airsoft Moviemaking

Discuss Safety issues and possible training ideas.

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Erik
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SAFETY: Airsoft Moviemaking

Post by Erik » Sun Mar 13, 2005 7:39 pm

The use of Airsoft guns in "videos" has been a topic of much discussion lately. The political climate following incidents like Columbine and near-fatal encounters between police and irresponsible amatuer "film-makers" is a significant threat to the public image of our hobby.

While we in the MAA do our best to discourage this, we know we can't really do much to stop it.

If you really want to make a "video" using Airsoft, make sure that before you do anything you notify EVERYONE in the immediate vicinity of what you are going to do. I'd recommend going door-to-door. This is what real movie productions do.

If any of them have a problem with what you are going to do, be sure to make a note of it (and you might want to consider calling the project off).

In addition to bystanders, you will want to notify local law enforcement, including the Police, Sheriff, and State Patrol. Make a note of who you contact and at what agency.

Unless you own a property, it's not yours to use for filming without permission. Private property requires permission from the landowner, and "public" property requires permission from whatever government agency runs it. Make sure you get this permission IN WRITING before filming.

Keep in mind - due to 9/11 concerns, in many "public" places videotaping may be restricted and/or bring about unwanted attention.

Many municipalities require a permit for "film-making" and don't distinguish between professional and amatuer productions. Be sure to check into this as well.

Always keep in mind - when someone sees you shooting a movie, they may not know what's going on and assume it's a real emergency. To a bystander, a movie can be more frightening than a game because in a movie you have scripted dialogue, fake blood, and other effects which may be misinterperted.

Amatuer movie makers, when acting irresponsibly, are a serious threat to the public image of Airsoft (second only to "street" games). These incidents have already happened more than once in Minnesota, and have resulted in several arrests and near-fatal police encounters.

In one incident which was reported on Fox News, Eagan Police arrested a group of minors who were brandishing Airsoft guns in a public parking garage. The teens claimed they were "making a movie for school."

You would never play Airsoft somewhere without proper co-ordination - so don't make movies without it either.

<small>[ March 13, 2005, 11:16 PM: Message edited by: Erik ]</small>
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Re: SAFETY: Airsoft Moviemaking

Post by Erik » Tue Nov 22, 2011 9:54 am

A movie production caused a scare in downtown Stillwater around 2:15 a.m. Sunday.

According to a Stillwater Police Report, an officer saw a man carrying what appeared to be a shotgun go inside Pub Monique's on Main Street North near Commercial Street.

The officer then heard a woman by the front door say, "He has a gun." As the officer got out of his squad, he saw the man raise the gun as he went into the bar.
Full story:

http://stcroixvalley.kstp.com/news/news ... lwater-bar
110% PureBred Professional GunFighter
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Erik
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Re: SAFETY: Airsoft Moviemaking

Post by Erik » Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:48 am

http://www.policeone.com/patrol-issues/ ... g-robbery/
A passer-by called 911 and reported a masked gunman inside the store, O'Leary said.

Officers responded and found the man behind the store counter. He was pointing a gun at the ceiling of the store when the officers overpowered and disarmed him, O'Leary said.

At that point, the officers discovered the gun was a replica and that a crew was filming the scene from across the street. The Japan-based crew had gotten the store's permission to film but had not applied for a permit to shoot the scene from the San Francisco Film Commission, according to O'Leary.

Police confiscated the replica gun but did not arrest the man, a 41-year-old city resident.

"The guy's lucky he didn't get shot," he said.
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